#554 – Walmart PPC Campaign Setup And Strategy Q&A

Let’s explore Walmart PPC advertising and its potential with the guidance of the incredible Destaney Wishon! In this riveting session, Carrie and Destaney take us on a comprehensive journey through the landscape of Walmart’s pay-per-click platform. She contrasts Walmart’s strategies with industry giants like Amazon and Google while emphasizing the unique advantages that come with Walmart’s strong retail foundation. For those of you looking to break into or expand your understanding of Walmart’s burgeoning online marketplace, Destaney’s wisdom is an indispensable asset.

Throughout our discussion, we tackle the subtle art of crafting effective advertising strategies for Walmart. We begin by casting a wide net with auto campaigns, gathering the crucial data that sharpen our approach for more targeted ad groups later on. Destaney highlights the significance of fine-tuning product listings to meet Walmart’s specific guidelines, and how this can dramatically improve your search algorithm outcomes. We also peek into the untapped potential of video and sponsored brand ads on Walmart, and share expert tips on leveraging tools like Helium 10 for keyword research. The knowledge shared here is a goldmine for sellers aiming to capitalize on the low advertising costs within certain categories on Walmart’s platform.

As we round off this episode, we discuss the nuances of optimizing product placement and advertising strategies, drawing insights from the evolution of Walmart’s auction system. Destaney provides us with actionable strategies for bid management and placement optimization that hinge on a deep understanding of data and market trends. We unpack the anticipated developments in Walmart’s PPC landscape, including the possibility of introducing negative keywords in auto campaigns, and how tools like Adtomic can revolutionize sellers’ PPC management. Join us for an episode packed with strategic insights that promise to elevate your advertising game on one of today’s fastest-growing online retail platforms.

In episode 554 of the Serious Sellers Podcast, Carrie and Destaney discuss:

  • 00:00 – Walmart PPC Campaign Setup and Management
  • 04:39 – Comparing Amazon and Walmart Advertising
  • 07:25 – Optimizing Walmart PPC Campaigns for Beginners 
  • 15:58 – Understanding Walmart Auction System for Advertising
  • 19:56 – Digital Shelf Advantageous for Sales
  • 24:27 – Common Mistakes in Advertising on Walmart
  • 25:15 – Optimizing Keywords and Advertising on Walmart
  • 29:41 – Importance of Conversion Rate Optimization
  • 30:39 – Walmart Wednesday PPC Insights

Transcript

Carrie Miller:

How should you set up your Walmart PPC campaigns, should you run automatic campaigns on Walmart, and how Adtomic can help you to better manage your Walmart PPC. This and so much more on this week’s episode of Walmart Wednesday.

Bradley Sutton:

How cool is that? Pretty cool, I think. We know that getting to page one on keyword search results is one of the most important goals that an Amazon seller might have. So, track your progress on the way to page one and even get historical keyword ranking information and even see sponsored ad rank placement with Keyword Tracker by Helium 10. For more information, go to h10.me/keywordtracker.

Carrie Miller:

Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of this Serious Sellers podcast hosted by Helium 10. My name is Carrie and this is our Walmart Wednesday, where we talk about everything Walmart, and I’m very, very excited today because we have an amazing guest. I’ve actually been wanting her to come on for quite some time because I’ve had a lot of PPC questions and so I am so excited to have a PPC expert in here. So, we have Destaney Wishon, and so I’m going to bring her on. Hey, Destaney, how’s it going?

Destaney:

Hello, hello, it’s going well. How are you?

Carrie Miller:

Good. Thank you, I’m very, very excited, as I told you before, to have you on here. I know there’s going to be a lot of questions that people are going to have, so I have a list of questions actually already that I know people have asked before and I’m going to start asking you those as well. But before we get started, just for anyone who isn’t familiar with who you are, can you give a little kind of like intro background and who you are? 

Destaney:

Yeah, of course. So, Destaney Wishon, CEO and founder of what was formerly Better AMS and is now Better Media. We really got started in this space managing Amazon advertising for the last seven years, I think back in the old days when it was Vendor Central, Seller Central and you had like AMS and different ad types and things are a lot more simple, which is going to be probably a really fun part of today’s conversation. And now we’ve rebranded, we’re Better Media and we manage kind of all the core large retailers in the space.

Carrie Miller:

The first thing is could you give us a little overview of what Walmart PPC advertising is and just how it differs from Amazon and Google, Because I know you’re basically on all the platforms, so you’re the best to answer this one.

Destaney:

I’d like to start honestly like a little bit more zoomed out and kind of philosophical on the platforms. I think a lot of us, and probably a lot of listeners, are accustomed to Amazon running the show. Right, when you think of e-commerce, when you think of selling and brand building, you do typically think of Amazon, but a lot of people forget, like Walmart wrote that playbook they were kind of the first ones to write that playbook their largest retailer. So, everything that you see Amazon being successful when it comes to e-commerce, Walmart’s already done in stores and physical retail, and I think that’s really important to note because one that means from a cashflow perspective, they’re in a really great position. It’s not a new company trying to compete directly with Amazon. Amazon does have AWS and everything externally driving a lot of revenue for them, but from an e-commerce platform perspective, Walmart has every brand connection when it comes to the largest brands in the world, right, Johnson & Johnson, Procter & Gamble, Nestle have been selling into Walmart for 40 years. So, that’s really important to consider because it’s framing how they shaped their Walmart platform and it’s framing how they’re hiring as well. They’re hiring a bunch of ex-Amazon talent. They’re not having to completely reinvent the wheel. They’re basically taking everything Amazon did that was really successful, and applying it to Walmart, but with that consideration that their audience is a little bit different. Right, the audience that’s typically going into Walmart is very used to the products that have always been in a Walmart shelf. Everything that you’ve historically bought your deodorant, your toothpaste, everything that you’ve grown up with is in Walmart, and that’s really how we’re also seeing their e-commerce platform being positioned. It’s giving favoritism to historical brands that are in stores. So that’s something to call it, because it’s kind of what we’re up against. Right, in order for Amazon to become Amazon, they need to differentiate themselves from Walmart, and they did it by opening up an amazing third party platform and allowing anyone to sell anything, because they didn’t need to sell the same products as Walmart. That wouldn’t have been as competitive. They needed to sell unique and new products and really grow this third party seller platform. Walmart’s taking a slightly different approach. Right, they’re making sure that they’re starting an e-commerce platform that still gives value to their products that are in stores. So, I want to start with that, because it’s shaped kind of how they ran ads Across the board. Advertising is actually really similar I would say. Walmart’s taking the exact same playbook. I mean there’s small differences. Amazon allows for better negating and better control, especially on the bid management level. From like a targeting perspective. Amazon’s doing a lot more moving into kind of DSP and better creatives and things like that. That being said, Walmart’s really where we are at five years ago with Amazon, with slight complexities, and that we have more control over placements and device type, which I think is pretty complex, and I’ll pause there and see if you have any thoughts on that.

Carrie Miller:

No, yeah, I think it’s. For me it’s been easier to start advertising on Walmart because it is kind of it is like very basic, kind of from the ground up. So, if you really want to learn advertising from the ground up it’s starting to just get your feet wet with Walmart advertising, I think it’s a good idea because you’re going to literally see it grow from the, from the ground up. You’ll be able to see all the changes and how things, um, you know, work together. So, I think it’s a really good thing to get in there if you haven’t yet done PPC.

Destaney:

A hundred percent. When we started on Amazon I think I’ve been in this space for seven years now possibly it just goes by really fast it was pretty much an auto campaign that you would just let run and it would do really really well for you and you didn’t have placement modifiers and you didn’t really have sponsor brands or sponsor display ads. It was great, it was easy. And then you took those auto campaigns, and we were able to apply them into manual campaigns with match types and Walmart’s taking that same approach. I will say I think Walmart can be. It looks a little bit more complex in my opinion. Like everyone says, advertising console user interface is terrible. But sometimes I walk into Walmart and I’m like, oh my gosh, this is too much information. I need these graphs to go somewhere else. I’m really overwhelmed logging into Walmart sometimes.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, they do give a good amount of information for sure. I guess that leads into the next question. So why do you think that someone would want to start advertising with Adtomic? Because we have Adtomic for Walmart now with Helium 10 to help you with your advertising, as opposed to just using the Walmart platform Walmart Connect.

Destaney:

Yeah, I think the biggest reason is bid management is, like 100%, one of the most important parts about Amazon or Walmart and you need a bid management solution for either platform. I actually think that it’s more important when it comes to Walmart strictly because they do have the search in grid and the placement modifiers and that adds complexity from a bid model perspective. If you come in and try to arbitrarily adjust all of these placements without knowing or having data, it’s going to be a big pain and then tracking the follow-up of that data is a pain. So fundamentally, from a bid management perspective, it needs to be done. You have to have a bid management solution if you’re advertising on either. I think the secondary aspect and this is again can be applied to both is just having a better view of your business. Like I said, I log into Walmart Connect and that initial graph that is shown. It’s not intuitive, but when you’re able to look at something and take away an ad and build custom reporting based off your overall business needs and I think that’s a big value add from an Adtomic perspective, it’s way more beneficial.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, definitely I agree, because I’ve used both and I felt the same way that I just needed an easier way to view what was going on, and the Adtomic platform is much better for that. So, if you do want something that’s easier to figure out where things are, what keywords are working or where to place things, then Adtomic is definitely the way to go for you. So, let’s get into some beginner questions then. For some beginners, how would you recommend that someone set up their PPC when they first start out? Do you think that people should do their keyword research and do exact campaigns, auto campaigns? What do you think about with Walmart and how you should get started?

Destaney:

I think something that we’ve seen is the Walmart customer searches a little bit different than the Amazon customer. So, rather than roll over the exact strategy that you’re running externally, we’ve actually we made this mistake as an agency, we came into our first few brands, and we tried to apply the exact strategy we did on Amazon. We copied and pasted over; we did our like. Everyone who knows us knows we do like a really granular campaign setup right One campaign, one ad group, one ASIN, five to 10 keywords. We tried that approach on Walmart, and it did not work. Like it was just it was. It was too little; everything was spread too thin. And then we heard the feedback of like hey, start with an auto campaign with all of your products in it, and we did that. And once we started collecting data, then we could start breaking things out into broader groups, and that helped us a ton Across the board. I think auto campaigns are a little bit more powerful on Walmart, which actually makes sense in my opinion. That’s how Amazon started as well. Auto campaigns were a lot more powerful because it was really easy to link the products in your campaign with the products that are associated with your SEO, and then your CPCs are quite a bit lower, so it’s a lot less risky. So, I think that’s the biggest feedback is don’t try to spread yourself too thin, group things into bigger groups and then collect data on what placements are doing best for you and segment past that.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, and just a call out with Helium 10, you can get Walmart search volume. So, with Cerebro you can find keywords. So, one of the things I did was I just did a bunch of keyword research, and I did notice that it’s not necessarily the same keywords that I would use on Amazon, and so they’re kind of more general, but there are some specific ones. Maybe they only have like 17 search volumes I have actually made sales on those, so if they’re very, very relevant, I would still use them, even if you’re like, oh, the search volume isn’t very good because people are finding you in other ways too. There’s Google ads and there’s a bunch of other things that Walmart’s doing to get people to your page. But yeah, so I would definitely advertise on those. But one of the things that was hard for me when I did an auto campaign was the fact that you can’t do any negative targeting, and so I was having the most random, weird keywords popping up that I don’t know how it happened, and so that is something to call out too is to keep an eye on your auto campaigns because of that situation. I don’t know if you have any ideas or thoughts about that.

Destaney:

One thing we’ve seen, and this is something that is just from auditing, not as much from kind of full management on the Amazon advertising side is you’re back in keywords and the keyword research you’re doing on Walmart is also really different. Walmart has different brand guidelines per category that cause a lot of specificity and nuance changes, and that’s important because auto campaigns work by scanning your listings, scanning all of your keyword research that you’ve done and associating with the keywords that are then in that auto campaign right. So, I don’t know in your specific use case, but something we’ve seen across the board is they’ll take their exact Amazon listing and again upload it to Walmart, not realizing that there’s category nuances and it’s a brand-new algorithm, it’s a brand new platform. They’re going to be tweaking things pretty consistently. So that’s something to consider that you need to make sure you’re understanding the algorithm on the platform you’re playing in. You need to update your listing for a Walmart customer for the Walmart algorithm, and that’s going to influence your campaigns and those auto campaigns as well.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, definitely Don’t copy and paste. I always say that do not copy paste.

Destaney:

One thing I want to hit on, because you had a great call out there is you may see something with really low search volume, and I would 100% still bid on those terms because it’s the same bidding model for the most part. It’s a pay per click bidding model. So, if you bid 10 cents and no one clicks, like you’re not hurting anything. So, it’s not really going to hurt your advertising to put all those low volume listings on there. What’s going to happen if someone does search? If only 10 people search a month? You’re going to be the only one bidding and it’s going to be really cheap and it’s going to be a crazy profitable sell for you. So those can drive a lot of incremental volume long term.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, 100%. And you can actually on Magnet, on Helium 10, I’ll take a list of all those kind of lower search volume keywords and that you can actually put them into magnet and there’s an analyze keywords and it’ll show you the total search volume. So, when you add it up it actually gives you a lot more exposure on Walmart. So that is one sale here, one sale here, and it adds up. So that’s the way you get from, you know, one sale a day to 10 to 20 sales a day. You know something that comes up every time.

Destaney:

You know something that comes up every time. Like we have this conversation of like there’s no volume on Walmart, or like I listed something and there’s no volume and it is dependent on category, of course. But you got to think. You know, from a grocery perspective there’s a ton of volume, like we’ve seen, very close to similar Amazon volume in certain categories, and that’s also influenced by your advertising. If there’s no volume, that also means your advertising costs are probably going to be pretty low. So sometimes it’s worth it to play in those spaces because you’re taking a long-term bet. Again, I keep comparing it to Amazon 7 years ago, but there were a lot of people who ran into the same thing then, but then they figured out the algorithm really well and they were able to scale that out long-term. So don’t compare it to Amazon. That’s not a fair comparison. They’re very different platforms, especially category specific.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, definitely I. Yeah there’s a lot of opportunity, even just like video ads and sponsored brand ads. I noticed on bigger keywords even there’s no video ads there’s. I mean, you wouldn’t see that on Amazon at all and so there is some really good opportunity if you really think strategically like, hey, this whole keyword, you know maybe it’s a little bit more competitive, but there’s no one doing a video ad, I can just go in and dominate. So, you kind of have to like, really, you just think about, you know different ways you can beat the competition with each different keyword, and you can capitalize on those sales.

Destaney:

And those are huge opportunities. So, we didn’t mention this in the beginning, but I’m based out of Bentonville, Arkansas, so most of my friends either work for Walmart or agency side, and Walmart for the Nestle and the Procter and Gamble’s and the General Mills has always been a big player online. So, it’s funny if you bid on mascara or cereal, it’s going to be competitive. But to Carrie’s point, if you can get into those creative opportunities, you’re always going to have a competitive advantage, because for General Mills to go create a video for every single SKU is incredibly costly and then they also need to send that video through marketing and legal. So, the time it takes them to create an asset specifically for a new platform and a new ad type is 6 to 9months by the time it’s briefed, created and approved. So that’s where we have a huge competitive advantage. Every time a new ad types rolled out, go hop in that platform or win some traffic and market share against the big name players in the space?

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, definitely, that’s a really good yeah, and I forgot to mention the Bentonville. So, do you have any insight, other insight thoughts about you? Know the fact that you’re in Bentonville.

Destaney:

It’s funny, it’s such a small community in Bentonville and when I started on Amazon, everyone would be like you can’t tell people you work for Amazon around here, cause it’s a competitive environment. But when Walmart started becoming a bigger player in the e-commerce space, I was like from day one, like this is going to be a huge opportunity, like Walmart is. I don’t want to say they’re too big to fail, but Walmart has the audience. Right, everyone knows Walmart. They’re the largest retailer, which means they have to have a lot of customers. They have the money, they’ve been in business for an incredibly long time and they’re attracting the talent from Amazon. Right, it reminds me of, like software world Everyone’s going to go to the big fun players in the space. So, I don’t think they have to reinvent the wheel and I think they’re going to make a big difference.

Carrie Miller:

I agree. I agree. There’s a lot of good opportunities there, so get on Walmart. If you’re not, can you talk a little bit about how the auction works on Walmart and what factors determine the placement? And all that information for everyone in the audience?

Destaney:

Historically the auction was quite a bit different, and it was a major red flag. It used to be an auction model where just the highest bid won. Yeah, so if you bid $12 and the second bid was $1, you weren’t paying a dollar and one cent, you were paying $12. So, that made things really difficult from a bid management perspective, from a brand perspective. Walmart finally transitioned that over. It acts pretty similar to Amazon and I love this question when it comes up into the groups of like suggested bids. Why are suggested bids so high? And one thing to consider is auction models and a PPC is just buying real estate. You want to win the top placements, the highest traffic placements, which is typically the top of the page. You have to bid the highest amount. Where Walmart gets a little bit more complex, and I like to the placements on Walmart. You know, searching Grid, Buy Box, mobile Desktop. I like to relate to kind of placement modifiers on Amazon. We always start with like a clean slate, a foundation of just a bid, like let’s win this placement, and then, once we start collecting data, we can start breaking out an increase in a placement or a higher bid elsewhere, and I recommend everyone do the same, like it doesn’t matter if you see a read an article that says you know mobile conversion rates are much higher than desktop. I wouldn’t go and make that bet. Instead, like we prefer, if you’re solely focused on profitability, start with low bids and a low auction and what’s going to happen is you may not get impressions in traffic and that’s fine, it’s still, it’s not hurting you, but increase incrementally until you collect data and you can figure out your breakeven ROAS. On the flip side, if you have money to spend, start high and collect data really quick and like. A big thing I’m a huge fan of is just to always make database decisions. They give you so much data you can see your placement performance and all of your keyword performance. So, wait till you collect data and then make bid decisions based off that.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, that’s really good. It’s really good that you called out how clunky it was before I took my ads before the relevancy model and before the second price auction. It was actually really hard because you actually couldn’t even advertise higher than you were organically ranked, so I was just stuck in these far-out places. Yeah, then literally that next month when they changed the relevancy, I went from $200 to about $800 for this product. Then I started going up and up and up and went to about $12,000 a month for just the one product because they changed these small little things in the advertising and so that’s a huge call out because people who were on back then were probably frustrated. So, I want to kind of let everyone know that it’s changed and it’s better.

Destaney:

It is changed, and I think that’s also a really important call out, just like organic rank. So, algorithms, again, are driven off like two things, especially like a shopping algorithm. One they need data, right, so they need a ton of inputs in order to say, hey, yes, this product should be indexed for Chapstick. They need 300 data points saying that customers convert for Chapstick right, so volume clicks and conversions matter. I think the second big thing is every platform wants to drive sales, so we were talking about this before hopping on, but in order to improve your organic rank on any platform, you need to sell more units, and how do you sell more units? That’s up to you to figure out. A lot of people say, oh, that’s Walmart’s job. I listed my product, now they need to sell it. It doesn’t quite work that way. It’s an algorithm, right, yeah? So, either you advertise on Walmart, and you start driving more units, which improves your organic rank, and as your organic rank improves, you get more visibility, which sells more units for you, or you figure out how to sell units off platform, one way or another. At the end of the day, though, like one of the biggest ranking juice factors is always going to be advertising on that platform because it’s so much more precise. Like we’ve seen conversion rates for sponsored ads and they’re incredible. So, yeah, highly recommend that.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, it’s just so funny that people have a different mentality when they come on Walmart like almost, I don’t know, I don’t want to say entitled, but it’s like they should do this for us, and they should do that. It’s like amazon doesn’t do that for you, amazon makes, makes you pay, yeah, so why not?

Destaney:

It’s kind of funny I don’t know if maybe it’s similar of like they’re thinking about a retail store like you get your PO and then Walmart puts your product on the shelf, but at the end, and then Walmart brings in that foot traffic, I guess. But at the end of the day, you’re competing against so many other products on a digital shelf yeah, competing against so many other products on a digital shelf. Yeah, a retail shelf, you can only squeeze 10 products, 10 toothpaste brands, like in that section. But a digital shelf is so much different, and you do have the opportunity to influence where you’re showing up on that shelf in a really simple way, and I think that’s advantageous.

Carrie Miller:

Well, even going back to retail, even when you get into retail you are supposed to move it. So, I remember talking or not talking, but like listening to Sarah Blakely with Spanx and she got her stuff into Neiman Marcus, and she was having her friends go buy it. She went into the stores for Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, and was selling these products herself.

Destaney:

It was like they thought she was like an in-store rep, because she was just sitting there like trying to sell her products. I remember that exactly.

Carrie Miller:

So. It’s like you know that ownership of. I want to get these products out there. My product is amazing, I want it in front of people. And so, another person I talked to about retail, as they said, historically people were always using billboards. They were using commercial advertising if they got into Walmart. So, once they get into Walmart, they are actually, you know, responsible to get to move the product as well, but it’s just a different way of doing it, and if they don’t move it on the shelf in the physical stores, Walmart would take them off. So, it’s, it’s the same thing. So always have that mentality of how can I, what can I do to move my product on this platform. I think that’s why I always think about Sarah Blakely, because you know she was not too, too good for going in there and literally working at the store all day, every day, so I love that.

Destaney:

And to that point, like one, she had that scrappy mentality, which was incredible. But this is a conversation that comes up. If you cannot afford to advertise on the platform, you know, become a connector, become an influencer, start hopping on lives, start doing TikTok’s and gaining that traction for yourself and then sending that traffic to your said platform. But to that point, I also think that’s where we’re spoiled by sponsored ad performance. Right, you’ve been on a keyword, someone clicks on it, and you see the results. But back in the day, it’s back in the day like what? 15 years ago, yeah, you were in a national media campaign, or you paid for a billboard, and you said here’s $50,000 for this billboard and all you could do is see if you saw a lift in overall sales. It was a lift test. That’s what marketing was judged by. Now we have the ability to pinpoint the age, income, geographic time of click and we’re spoiled by it.

Carrie Miller:

It’s pretty amazing. Yeah, I actually to your point about you know, if you get scrappy. I’ve actually seen some people you know that use Helium 10 and they’re like I don’t, I don’t have that great of a budget, but they chose products kind of in their hobby niche. They’ll go live and do demos or on YouTube. They have YouTube channels where they show how to use their product and they sell it with the links. You know they can link it to one more and amazon, and so they they’re doing that and that’s how they’ve gotten a ton of traction. So, definitely think outside the box if you’re not able to, you know, invest in PPC.

Destaney:

Sean Reily from DUDE Wipes is a ton of incredible content on how they started, because he, he, they had to be so scrappy that they would just like buy these really crazy like billboard placements or bid on these certain placements that they knew would get tv attention. They were going to baseball games and holding up signs like with their products names and then when the baseball aired, they would be in the background holding their signs. And it’s that exact same thing of just how you get in front of people.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, it’s so amazing. Yeah, so that’s a good call out there. Okay, so we do have some questions here from the audience and of course Bradley has asked the first one. He said let’s see, does Walmart broad phrase and exact perform similar to Amazon or does it have weird things like Amazon where broad can go super wide and exact sometimes performs?

Destaney:

Performs like phrase even?  I would say they’re similar. I think Amazon sponsored brands broad match is a little bit of an outsider and just the overall conversation with sponsored brands broad match we’ve seen go really wide lately. I have pulled all of our agency data to see if we’ve seen a change in conversion rate on sponsored products broad match and we haven’t. So, I’m kind of like I don’t want to make a huge comparison there, but I would say they’re very similar.

Carrie Miller:

What are some common mistakes that you see new beginners doing on, you know, with advertising or just getting on Walmart in general?

Destaney:

I would say poor keyword research. We dove into this one a little bit. But to go even deeper on that, I think some people overthink keyword research and at the end of the day, it’s like what would you type in to find this product? Yep, start with that. Like make a commonsense list of the top 10 keywords that you would type in, not the ones that are algorithmically showing the highest revenue, not the ones that a tool is showing you. Start with common sense keywords I’m buying mascara or Chapstick or lunchbox, right and then use the tools to expand on those, because it’s twofold here. Your commonsense keywords are almost always going to be the most expensive because if you’re thinking about bidding on them, so is everyone else right. But where you have a lot of opportunities, you take all of the Helium 10, long tail terms that you didn’t think about right. So, if you use something again like a Chapstick, everyone’s going to bid on Chapstick. But if I find this long tail of, like peppermint Chapstick for chapped lips, children, non-toxic, it’s going to be such low search volume. But you have to add up hundreds of those, 50 of those, like Carrie said, and that’s where you’re going to get your profitability. It’s still, even though it’s early days, from a platform. There’s a lot of big-name players that are driving up ad costs. I would say where that’s where it’s a little bit different from amazon, right like all of your big-name players are in stores on Walmart, they’re also advertising on dot com. So, you still have to be really strategic around that keyword research you. You have to figure out, you know what terms are going to drive the most sales for you but maybe not be profitable. What terms can you get a really long tail on? That’s going to drive additional volume but take a little bit more work to invest in. Not having a bid management solution is 100% number two. A lot of people don’t understand bid management. I don’t expect people to. It took me 3 years and probably over $30 million of spin before it became intuitive. I had to touch so many accounts in order to start figuring out the correlation of bid management, and there’s a lot of simple videos on just bid formulas. But if you’re not that person, if you’re not going to understand algorithmically and mathematically how to build a bid solution, not a lot of us are, you need to use a tool? Your bid is the number one indicator of what your ROAS or ACOS is going to be.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, so I guess that brings you back to Adtomic. Are there any other kind of parts of Adtomic you think that are helpful for sellers?

Destaney:

Custom reporting, I think, is a big one. To that point, when you’re starting out and starting to build a midsize business, your focus almost changes. In the very beginning you’re in everything because it’s your baby. It has to be perfect. As you start scaling you realize you’re spread too thin. So, you start picking up what you’re best at and I think that’s where a tool like Atomic really comes into play. It’s 80-20. It’s you know. Let’s build out either custom reports so I can focus on what I need best, whether it’s my tacos, whether it’s my margin, whether it’s my conversion rate, or even getting into, like some of your other tools, market tracker, things like that. That’s where it gets really valuable. In my opinion, it’s bringing back time for you as an entrepreneur. It’s not going to be as perfect. Every business owner thinks they’re perfect, right. You have to start letting go some of those resources because in order to have a successful brand nowadays, you have to be good at product development. You have to optimize per platform. You probably need a social presence. You need to handle forecasting and inventory. You need to handle finances in your P&L. It’s insane how much goes into. It’s amazing that we have the opportunity to do it from our iPhone, but it’s also insane how complex it is. So, you have to start bringing in tools that maybe aren’t as good, but they allow you to scale your own time.

Carrie Miller:

I know I get this question a lot. Maybe somebody’s advertising already and they feel like they’ve done a lot of things to kind of optimize. What kinds of things do you recommend for people to take their sales to the next level like? Maybe they feel like they’re stagnant. Are there any kind of go-to strategies you have for Walmart where people can kind of say, hey, if I implement this, I could probably see a lift, or what should I? Which they look at that maybe people are ignoring that they should be looking at.

Destaney:

I want to get into like all the fun small things of like ad type expansion and all of that, but I want to call out just conversion rate optimization first, because it’s super easy to blame a lack of sales or bad performance on the thing that you least understand, which is typically advertising. It’s typically PPC and just coming from the agency side, I mean we’ve heard it all in that regard and I think a really important call out is if someone clicked on your ad, if you look at your campaign and you see clicks, that ad did its job Because think about it as a customer, as I personally shop on Walmart, I don’t go around just clicking on things that I’m not interested in buying. So, if the customer clicked, that means they were interested in it, but they landed on your listing and they decided not to buy, and your job is to decide why they didn’t purchase. Is your listing not good enough? Is it not the color or the flavor that you’re looking for? So, conversion rate optimization is always the thing that we say to start with. If you have a little bit of extra profit in your account and you need to invest in something, start with conversion rate optimization, because it’s going to make your PPC 20 times better. And then beyond that, I would say another big thing to call out that can really influence top line sales growth is making sure you’re managing your PPC not just for advertising but to grow your overall organic rank. So, creating campaigns specifically focused on improving your organic positioning on the page.

Carrie Miller:

Very good. All right, and we do have a good PPC question here. Ben Tiffany said any word on when Walmart will start allowing us to create negative search terms on our auto campaigns?

Destaney:

I would probably give it another quarter or end of year. Honestly, I think it’s too blaring of a discrepancy to not roll out, so I’m assuming it’s on the roadmap for pretty soon.

Carrie Miller:

Yeah, I have heard it’s on the roadmap, so I thought it would already be out. So maybe they’re just taking a little more time to make sure that it works well. So yes. Yeah, that’s probably what’s going on here, but I think we’re pretty much out of time. But thank you so much for joining us today on this Walmart Wednesday and we really appreciate your insights for PPC. We haven’t really done a whole lot on PPC, so hopefully we’ll be able to get you back on here at some point and do some more Walmart PPC stuff. But thanks again for joining us and to everyone else, thank you for your questions and thank you for joining us live and we will see you all again next month on Walmart Wednesday. Bye, everyone. 

Destaney:

Awesome. Thank you, Carrie. Bye guys.


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Principal Brand Evangelist

A 7-figure e-commerce seller, Carrie began her journey on Amazon, expanding rapidly to Shopify and now Walmart.com. Currently serving as the Principal Brand Evangelist for Walmart.com tools at Helium 10, she's deeply passionate about sharing success strategies, tips, and tricks with fellow e-commerce sellers.

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