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#417 – Amazon Search Query Performance, Brand Analytics, & More!

We’re back for part 2 of this series, and in this episode, Bradley’s going to talk about search volume and how the Amazon algorithm calculates it. Plus, more results of his case studies!
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31 minutes read

In today’s episode, you’re going to learn a lot of things that are going to knock your socks off! Bradley dives deep into search volume and how the Amazon algorithm calculates it. We talk about search funnel impressions, purchase documentation, and much more! Also, we’ll get an answer on why Brand Analytics is not Bradley’s priority for Amazon data anymore and how Helium 10’s data can work hand-in-hand with Amazon Search Query Performance and the Search Query Details section. At the end of the day, we are all very blessed to have all these data points from Amazon, and learning how to use them well with Helium 10 can supercharge your Amazon business. How cool is that? Pretty cool, I think.

In episode 417 of the Serious Sellers Podcast, Bradley talks about:

  • 01:45 – Amazon Has Stepped Up On The Data Game
  • 03:50 – Amazon’s Search Funnel Impressions
  • 06:45 – Search Funnel – Purchases Documentation 
  • 09:50 – Testing It Out On Case Studies
  • 12:30 – Why Brand Analytics Is Not My Favorite Anymore
  • 13:40 – Comparing Brand Analytics Results To Search Query Performance
  • 16:40 – How Search Query Performance Data Makes Sense With Helium 10’s Keyword Tracker
  • 20:00 – How It Affects Product Targeting Ads
  • 21:35 – How Search Query Performance Counts Actions Inside Amazon
  • 24:30 – Understanding The Search Query Details Section
  • 26:30 – What Are The Takeaways Of This Episode
  • 27:30 – Using Helium 10 And SQP Hand In Hand Is The Key
  • 31:00 – Amazon Sellers Are Blessed To Have All This Data

Transcript

Bradley Sutton:

All right, guys, we’re back for part two in a series where do a deep dive into search volume and how the Amazon algorithm calculates it. Search Query Performance, Brand Analytics, and much more. You’re gonna learn some things that are gonna knock your socks off. How cool is that? Pretty cool I think.

Bradley Sutton:

You wanna see the size of your niche or your market, maybe how much sales overall is it generating, and more importantly, how the size of your piece of that pie changes over time. Or maybe you want to know when there’s a new mover or shaker, an up and comer in your niche that you need to be on the lookout for. You can monitor these things and more with Market Tracker by Helium 10. Find out more information at h10.me/markettracker. Hello everybody, and welcome to another episode of the Serious Seller’s Podcast by Helium 10. I am your host Bradley Sutton, and this is the show that’s a completely BS-free unscripted, and unrehearsed organic conversation about serious strategies for serious sellers of any level in the e-commerce world. And now this is our second in a two-part series where I’m showing you some case studies that I’ve been working on for the last month where I’m trying to figure out what is search career performance, taking into consideration what is Brand Analytics and Amazon taking into consideration. You know, for those of you who are newer sellers, don’t tune out if some of this is kind of like foreign to you. This is important stuff that you guys need to be using. So even if you’re not ready for it now, bookmark this and listen to it now and then come back once you’re ready, because this is important stuff that’s gonna help you level up on Amazon. All right, so now I don’t know, again, you might not have, you might not cut it exactly at this moment, but here’s the rest of it.

Bradley Sutton:

Now, first of all I said this before, earlier in the podcast that Amazon really has stepped up with showing additional kind of like documentation as far as what search career performance is taking into consideration. And now the reason why this is important is because the numbers were looking like way off, all right? For example, I took a look at six different brands, about 25 different products. And what I was doing was I was like adding up what it said, how many sales my product got or a brand got from searches, right? And you know, like knowing that, hey, probably like more than half of my sales come from search. Like I guess know that cause I’m not sending outside traffic. You know, there’s nobody on TikTok promoting our coffin shelves and things like most of our orders come from search, whether it’s PPC or organic, but it was crazy on average only 17 to like 25% of what search career performance sales, which say it was only like 17% to 25% of what my actual sales were.

Bradley Sutton:

Like, for example, for a coffin shelf, it was saying it only attributed 94 sales in a month to search in search career performance. But I looked at my sales data, we sold 531 coffin shelves for that same exact month, right? That’s, that’s a 17% only search creator performance was showing. I mean, heck, for PPC by itself just the keyword coffin shelf, forget all the other PPCC just the keyword coffin shelf brought over 100 sales to the products. But search performance was saying for every single keyword out there, we only had like 94 sales. So I was like, wait a minute. And I think you guys probably have seen this. You’re like, wait a minute, what in the world, why is it so different? And it’s not necessarily to say that it’s wrong, right? It’s not to say that it’s wrong, but it is showing something different than what you were expecting.

Bradley Sutton:

And before you had no idea. But now Amazon has gone to the next level and really made sure they had some good documentation. So take a look at this if you haven’t seen it yet. Amazon’s documentation, for example, for impressions, it says, when an ASIN is displayed for a query, it means it received one impression, right? So I search for a keyword and then my product is organically showing up there. That’s one impression. Now, check this out. It includes both organic and sponsored products. So like, theoretically speaking, I search for a keyword, and if I’m on page one in organic and sponsored products, I have two impressions, right? But take a look at this, it says it excludes ASINs displayed in a widget such as editorial recommendations, top rated and highly rated. So those are sponsored product positions, but they are not counted as impressions.

Bradley Sutton:

And thus anything that is also counted there is not counted as sales. It says it includes product displayed to the customers, irrespective of whether the product is in the scrollable view or below the fold. That basically means like, let’s say I land on a page, I don’t scroll at all, but my product’s at the bottom of the page, right? Even though the customer never sees it, it is still counted as an impression, all right? It also includes ASINs from pages rendered to the customer and not the secondary pages that did not get views. For example it says, Hey, if there’s a product in the search results and it’s on page 10, but I never scrolled to page 10, I am not going to get an impression there, all right? But it’s counted the interesting thing, it says if it’s rendered in the second page for the query, then it will be included.

Bradley Sutton:

So that’s kind of weird. So that almost leads me to believe that, okay, maybe it’s not on page 10, which it literally says right there, but does that mean if I am on page one and I have an organic position there and I have a sponsor position on page two, it seems like it’s saying even though the customer doesn’t scroll to page two, it’s counting that as an impression. So that’s kind of weird. I’m not sure a hundred percent sure on that. But that’s what the documentation says. It also says it includes counts from refinement. So like, let’s say you type in coffin shelf and then the customer sees the search results, and then they hit like, show me only the black ones those in the left hand side, they hit black, right? And now all of a sudden it filters out everything that’s not black.

Bradley Sutton:

That’s another impression. Even though they haven’t even gone to any other pages or they haven’t refreshed a page or anything like that, that counts as another impression. So now you can start to kind of see like, whoa, it, it’s not necessarily over counting the search volume. Remember in the last episode I was talking about how, or in the last time I was talking about how the search volume seems like inflated. It’s because these are all counting multiple times for all of these different scenarios. Now, as far as the documentation of what it counts as purchases here, again, Amazon’s stepping up and is telling us, it says, Hey, it only counts when the purchase action happened for the query, right? So if you purchase five of the same ASIN, that’s only a single purchase. It also says it includes purchases that occurred in a day.

Bradley Sutton:

All right? So for example, if somebody makes a search, all of these things like impressions and clicks and add to carts and purchases, it has to have appeared within the 24 hour period. All right? So like, for example, a scenario of why, again, this is why the purchases is so low, right? Compared to the overall purchases that we know come from these keywords. So for example, let’s say I search coffin shelf. I click the product immediately, it’s gonna count as a click. I add it to my cart immediately after that, it’s gonna cl count in search crew performance as an add a cart, but I leave it in the cart, and then the next day I go in and I, I go ahead and check out and pay for it. I don’t get credit in Search Query Performance for that purchase. Secondly, let’s say I click a different product the way, and I’m gonna explain how, how this works how I was able to figure this out.

Bradley Sutton:

If I click a different product and then I click back, it seems like Amazon is not counting that as a purchase. Like, if I click back and then click another product and buy it for whatever reason, Amazon is not counting that in Search Query Performance. Another scenario that doesn’t work, like let’s say I click on a sponsored ad, all right, that counts as a click. And if I buy it right in that time period, that’s actually an orderor that’s actually a order that is attributed in Search Query Performance. But let’s say I click on a product and then I click like a sponsored ad on that page. Now, theoretically, that click still happened after a search I typed in coffin shelf, right? I typed in coffin shelf I clicked on a product and I’m just clicking another product that I see on the page, whether it’s frequently bought together or whether it’s Amazon recommended or whether it’s some kind of product targeting ad.

Bradley Sutton:

But if I purchase anything after clicking on a product that’s not that product, Amazon Search Query Performance does not count it. All right? So that’s the reason why the number is so small. Like I said, sometimes as low as 17% is because it kind of like only counts kind of I don’t know. I’m gonna make up a word, but another reason why it’s not counting so many is because it’s kind of like counting only, I dunno, real time purchases as it were, like I have to click on something and then buy it, and then it’s counted. All right? So like, if I start clicking around or clicking back on my browser, now all of a sudden it’s not gonna be attributed as it works right now. So what I did for a case study and I did multiple ones I’m just gonna talk about one of them that we did right here.

Bradley Sutton:

But what I did was I was like, all right, let me get a group of people together. Let me first find a keyword that I know I can control a little bit. All right? So like, I wasn’t gonna do cough and shelf where there’s tons and tons of people searching for it, tons of people clicking it and adding to the cart and purchasing it. I’m gonna pick a lower keyword that I know that almost all of the activity around it is gonna be what me and like my team are doing. You know, we’re the ones doing the clicks and we’re doing the ads to carts. And then I came up with all these kind of like different scenarios about like, Hey, click this first and click on the highly rated and, and click back on your browser and then add it to card and then purchase it the next day.

Bradley Sutton:

Like, I did like so many scenarios I’m gonna show you guys a little bit of our, our chart, but we were like going day by day and different ones of us we’re doing different clicks and doing different things and PPC and we were logging it all. And then the point of this was I wanted to see how Amazon analytical tools displayed what was going on. I wanted to see how it looked in Brand Analytics on the daily report. Did it pick up my clicks? Did it pick up my purchases? How it looked in the Brand Analytics weekly report, how it looked in the Search Query Performance weekly report, how it showed up in Amazon PPC using Atomic did it understand that it was a sponsored ad that you know, got this click, et cetera, et cetera.

Bradley Sutton:

So I was trying to test as much as possible. So let’s go ahead and talk about what were some of the results. So for example, on January 1st, I personally did some of these tests. So my part of this, again, I had a whole team o of people who was working on this. What I personally did was I clicked on the product in the search results, and then I purchased it. And then a few hours later, I did the same, same search again. And then I clicked a different product. So looking back on Brand Analytics on that date 1/1/2023, there is one product that had 50% of the clicks and another product, which was my product that had 50% of clicks, and I had a hundred percent of the conversion. So obviously there was only one order that day, or there was only one sale that day, and it was me. So Brand Analytics got this, right? But here’s what’s interesting. Now, the next thing, I did a full week, my team was doing all kinds of testing, like, like I said, clicking on sponsored products and stuff.

Bradley Sutton:

So the next thing at the end of the week, I looked at the weekly Brand Analytics to take a look at what was going on. Now, as you can see here, it says that our product, this coffin egg tray, we got 87.5% of the clicks and a hundred percent of the conversions. But this spoon, this like blood shaped spoon, it said it had 12.5% of the clicks. Now the thing that was troubling, again, we, we clicked on different products. But Brand Analytics did not pick up on it, unfortunately. So that’s a little bit troublesome. Now looking at Search Query Performance for the same week, that was the other thing I did. I did all these tests and I did all these like clicks and sponsored ads and stuff, and now I saw Brand Analytics displayed it.

Bradley Sutton:

How did Search Query Performance display this data? All right, so I looked at search career performance for the same exact week. And then for this keyword, which by the way, guys, I don’t know if I mentioned it, but it’s spooky kitchen was the keyword word that I used it. Actually, this is quite kind of like interesting here, right? Do you remember how in Brand Analytics it said I had 87.5% of the clicks? And I’m like, that can’t be right because I know I have other products I clicked on. Well look for the same exact week, the same exact days. Look what Search Query Performance says. It says I had 14% of the clicks. That’s a huge difference, guys. You can see how much more search career performance is picking up on clicks compared to Brand Analytics. 14% compared to 87%, that is like not even comparable.

Bradley Sutton:

That is huge, huge difference. Now, just really, really quick, one thing now that we’re looking at this Search Query Performance, I wanted to call out, this is something that you can start doing on your own. This is interesting. It says here, search query volume was 336 for the week. That means 300, supposedly 336 times people searched it or kick click back on their browser et cetera, et cetera. Now, look at my impressions. This is called ASIN count. My impressions were 310, meaning on average, I was there every single time somebody clicked back or whatever. Our product showed up. Now compare that to like gothic kitchen where it had 3000 searches, but I only had 431 impressions. Meaning only like 10% of the time that a search was done, I even showed up to the customer.

Bradley Sutton:

Now, this is very interesting data that Amazon has never shown before, but the problem here is without Helium 10, you might not have the context, right? So like, wait, why is one number on a one-to-one basis almost impressions or searches, and then my impressions and the other one was like 10 to 1. Well, now this is where you can start going into Helium 10 and kind of like reverse engineer what happened. So now I’m showing you guys Keyword Tracker, and if I look at Spooky Kitchen, right? Look at my organic rank, page one, position one, two, and three. Look at my sponsored rank. Page one position, 1, 2, 3, 4. All right? So now it makes sense. Well, no wonder why every single time there was a search for this keyword, I got an impression because I am right there at the top of the page.

Bradley Sutton:

I was probably getting two impressions for a lot of these. Now take a look at Gothic kitchen. Remember the one that was kind of like 10 to one, like there was 10 searches for only every one impression I had. I’m right here in keyword tracker and I’m looking, my organic rank is position 70. So now I know, wait a minute, the only people that I were getting impressions from was people who were like scrolling to page three or page two, but my sponsored rank, I was on page one, but you know, it looks like not always I was on page one, like right now I’m on page two. So this is why it’s so important to kind of likeput both of these data points together is because now I can see that, hey, I get this information from Search Query Performance about how many times I’m showing up, but to really understand what’s going on and what needs to improve, that’s where I need like the Helium 10 data or the Keyword Tracker data.

Bradley Sutton:

And you know, I’m sure other tools have keyword trackers too. You can, you could look at that same data. Alright, now going back to my case study. Remember, I wasn’t just comparing it to Brand Analytics and Search Query Performance, I wanted to compare it to what PPC advertising reports were saying, cuz I was doing a lot of sponsored ads and I was having my team click on sponsored ads and do ad to carts from there as well. And now for the most part, the PPC data lined up, you know we were doing product targeting, the clicks were attributed correctly. Now the interesting thing, and, and this is almost a philosophical discussion itself, was as the week went on, I was actually getting more product-targeting clicks. You know, the product targeting ad being where I’m targeting a certain competitor ASIN so that I show up on their page somewhere on there right now I started getting more product targeting clicks that I know was happening.

Bradley Sutton:

So this is my theory on this. So when you do a product targeting ad, yes, like principally you would think that it shows up on the actual product. Like here, here’s one that we are product targeting with our coffin tray. It’s this coffin bar mat. What are they gonna think of next? Right? And if I scroll down here, and then right here, products related to this item, look, our coffin egg trays right there. So that’s one of the things that our team did was that they clicked this from the page, but then as the week went on, we were getting an abnormally high number of product targeting clicks instead of just my keyword targeting once. So what could be happening is, because remember, once I landed on this page, this ad is gonna kind of like follow me around Amazon.

Bradley Sutton:

So like for example, the next day, let’s say like the next day, and remember some of my team was doing this every other day. Well, if they were going to type in Spooky Kitchen in the search results, the sponsored ad is coming, some of those might have been my product targeting ad that’s now following me around and it wasn’t my sponsored keyword. I hope that makes sense. It’s kind of hard to explain, but this is important to understand. The way that Amazon PPC works is that I’m not just going to get clicks only if somebody clicks on my listing on this page, and this is important to understand because it helps you to kind of like work your strategy out is because you want people who click on your other products or on your competitor’s products to kind of like be cookie by Amazon and so that your ad now follows them around, right?

Bradley Sutton:

So we got all these other clicks because probably other people had clicked on a competitor’s product and then they saw our ad and then now maybe they saw it in another search like later on for even another keyword. So product targeting ads are really great. Anyways, I’m kind of digressing here on that, but I thought that was a really interesting kind of like inaction scene how Amazon PPC works. Now, again, going back to Search Query Performance, it was really, really good for the full week. It had almost all of the clicks that I know I made. It was like, I think we had done 11 clicks and Search Query Performance said there was 12. So it was like right there that that one click might have been from somebody else or maybe a click that I didn’t mark.

Bradley Sutton:

So it was like right there, even the add to carts, like we did some add to carts and then we didn’t purchase it, we just add to cart. We wanted to see if Search Query Performance picked it up. Sure enough, Search Query Performance picked almost all of them up. Now the interesting thing is, that week I actually purchased three units, Search Query Performance said only one unit was purchased. And again, so it was because I did multiple clicks on those other purchases that kind of like nullify search, career performance counting it. Alright? So again, do not think that the number that search career performance says is your sales for certain keywords that is a hundred percent of your sales. It’s only like 20 to 25%. Now, the next week, I did it again for another week because I was like, I wanted to like kind of like hone in on my tests a little bit more to kind of work on some of my theories.

Bradley Sutton:

And so we did it again, I had a group of people even Carrie and Shivali and Mhel and Nikko, they were all working on it and they were doing different clicks and different things. And again, it was very similar. So true performance was picking up the clicks, but Brand Analytics wasn’t. And another way that Brand Analytics is different, and again, not trying to say one is right and one is wrong, they’re just apples and oranges. But was that in Brand Analytics for the week? It said that my product had 50% of the sales and another product had 50%, meaning that the total number of sales attributed to that keyword in Brand Analytics for that week had to have been an even number. Does that make sense? You know, that number could be two, it could be 10, it could be eight, it can’t be seven, right?

Bradley Sutton:

Because it wouldn’t have come out to a whole number if two if two products made up a hundred percent of the sales and there was only two of them, it has to be an even number in Search Query Performance for the week. The total number of sales that it says was generated from Spooky Kitchen was five. So again, this is like a hundred percent confirmation if you didn’t believe it yet. Brand Analytics and Search Query Performance definitely is apples and oranges. It’s not talking about the same thing. You can literally not have 50% of five sales. I didn’t split one coffin shelf in or coffin egg tray in half and send one to one customer and one to another customer. Now again Brand Analytics only showed two different products for the entire week getting clicks, one of them being mined. This was super disappointing to me.

Bradley Sutton:

It means that for some of these lower searched keywords, Brand Analytics just for whatever strange reason, just doesn’t count clicks anymore, right? And so you’re not gonna get a lot of information. Now, if you actually look inside of earch Query Performance, there’s this new feature that’s called Search Query Details. The way you can get here is if you’re on the regular Search Query Performance page and you click on any keyword under Search Query, right? And it brings up this new page and gives you it’s not necessarily the top 10 clicked here, it’s just basically top 10 according to Amazon’s algorithm. But take a look here, it shows how many products. There’s like 10 different products here. There’s like 10 different products that it says had clicks. Again, Brand Analytics says there was only two different products that had clicks for this keyword.

Bradley Sutton:

But now on this page, this other Search Query Performance is called Search Query Details is telling me that there is 10 different products that had clicks. And this is not even anywhere near the total number of clicks because if you add up these products that it shows here, this only adds up to like, I don’t know, like 30-40% here. So it’s not even showing 60% of the other products that had clicks. And it actually says, Hey, in this whole keyword of Spooky Kitchen for the week, there were 121 clicks. Obviously, not all of those came from me. Only 17 of those clicks came from me for my product. That means thatthere’s all these other products that had all these clicks that Brand Analytics just isn’t even picking up. So again, for me, Brand Analytics used to be my favorite rock solid thing.

Bradley Sutton:

It’s still my favorite rock solid thing for kind of like search volume, like how to know what is search more. But if you’re really wanting to know what’s going on with the number of clicks, do not rely on Brand Analytics because who knows what the heck is going on there for the lower search one, if you’ve got Search Query Performance, that is absolutely the place to go to, like have an idea about what’s going on on the clicks. So what’s the takeaways from all of this? Likelike what am I gonna take away from this? I mean, there’s a, yes, of course I did this case study that took like 50 hours to do for this podcast episode, but it’s also to help with my own business, my own Amazon businesses.

Bradley Sutton:

And so how can you guys take this information? Well, first of all, if you’re trying to do keyword research for a brand new product or you’re opening up a new brand that’s, that’s outside of your existing niche you just need Helium 10. I’m not trying to be a salesman here, but that’s just the end of then one of this stuff I was showing you about Search Query Performance. You have zero access to that outside of what you’re already selling. So Helium 10 has access to the other data. So you definitely need Helium 10 if you’re expanding, but if you are expanding with you’re your own brand, you still need Helium 10. But I would highly, highly recommend diving into your Search Query Performance to get all of this added information that you never had visibility on before.

Bradley Sutton:

But at the same time, you still need a tool like Helium 10. And the reason is because this Search Query Performance, it’s showing you the top hundred or 1000 keywords that your product is currently performing for. By definition, if there’s a keyword out there that you’re not even indexed for, obviously that’s not even gonna show up here. So it’s important to do your competitor research. One thing that Search Query Performance does not do, and it probably never will do, it’s not gonna show you detailed information on what your competitor is doing. You know, Amazon’s not gonna display that. And Helium 10 is not showing you hack the information or something, but it’s showing an aggregation of public information that’s out there. So it’s still very important to supplement your research by using Helium 10, especially Cerebro and Keyword Tracker, to see what your competitors are doing, what keywords are they crushing it on, that you are not, right?

Bradley Sutton:

And then once you get them in your ecosystem, now you use Search Query Performance to kind of take a more very granular, detailed look at your impressions and how many impressions you have versus their search career volume, how many ads of cards you’re having, what’s your conversion rate like, how many purchases you have historically. This is, it’s only showing you about 20% of the data, which again, I know it sounds like a beating a dead horse here, but that’s why you use Helium 10’s to kind of like get the rest of that 80% of data that you need. But this 20% of sales that it’s showing you exactly the funnel that people on Amazon use to make the purchase, I mean, this is gold guys. Helium 10 never showed this data before Amazon never showed this data before, even to vendors, they didn’t have access to this.

Bradley Sutton:

So this is super, super cool that you guys definitely need to be using. Another thing that’s important, remember this only shows sponsored product in Search Query Performance and organic positions. There are so many other placements on page one nowadays from editorial recommendations, the highly recommended Sponsored Brand Ads, Sponsored Video Ads, and Search Query Performance is not counting any of these impressions, any of these sales or anything. This is still something you need to be accounting for when you’re doing your research. And again, if you’re an elite member, you can do that inside of Helium 10 Cerebro. You can actually see for a product which products are showing up in all these other eight different widgets whether it’s from our brands or editorial recommendations or sponsored brand video ads or sponsored brand headline ads. You can see all of that in Cerebro and see what your competitors and strategies are, where you guys are showing up.

Bradley Sutton:

And then marry that data with what you find in search career performance, which is showing the organic side of things. So guys, we went over a lot of information in these last couple of episodes. You know, search volume, I hope you guys can, can take you know, this mini masterclass about search volume and be able to understand how to prioritize your products or your keywords in your products listings. You know, we went over all of these different data points you know, in Search Query Performance, et cetera. It might seem overwhelming the amount of data that is out there now, but guys, you cannot imagine how people in other industries that don’t sell on Amazon would kill for this kind of data, right? People are practically blind out there in other, in other fields, they don’t know what’s bringing them sales, they don’t know what’s going on.

Bradley Sutton:

But as Amazon sellers, we are really hashtag blessed with this plethora of information that Amazon is providing that Helium 10 is providing, that other tools are providing. But it’s not gonna do you any good if you don’t get out there and use it. So I want you guys to get your own strategy. There’s not like one formula of exactly how to use this information that’s gonna work for everybody. Get the formula that works for you, but it’s important to combine the data and not get confused by it. That it, they might be showing different numbers and things. No, it’s because things are, they’re comparing apples and oranges, all right? So understand which data point is talking about what and which are the important ones that you need. Kind of like take away all the other noise and the laser focus and get a strategy on how you are going to do keyword research for what you’re not getting sales for, what you are getting sales for, and all of these data points that we talked about today and the last episode is gonna help you get there.

Bradley Sutton:

So I want you guys to use this a lot. If you’re in the elite Facebook group, make sure to hit me up, let me know what you thought about this and let me know if you have any questions on this. I’m gonna keep working on this. I’m gonna be using what I learned in this case study to be optimizing my current listings using all these new data points. And I want you guys to be doing that as well. So hope you guys found this enjoyable and I’ll see you in the next episode.


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